Streaming Events

The Best Things to Do from Home in Portland this Week: April 1-7

Oscar-Nominated Shorts, a Reed College Recording of Howl, and More
March 31, 2021
This year's Oscar-nominated shorts (including Adrien Mérigeau and Amaury Ovise's "Genius Loci," pictured) will be available to stream at home via Hollywood Theatre and Cinema 21 starting Friday. (Courtesy SIFF)

Whether you're a regular EverOut Portland reader (thank you, friend!) or you're new (welcome, pal!), note that our weekly streaming picks will now be posted on Thursdays (as opposed to Mondays) and will include events through the following Wednesday. Sign up for our Friday emails to make sure you never miss them! With that said, see below for ways to stay entertained at home this first week of April, from a reading with comic memoirist Jenny Lawson to virtual screenings of the 2021 Oscar-Nominated Shorts to Mary Kathryn Nagle's play Manahatta. For even more options, check out our complete guide to COVID-safe April events.


Jump to: Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Multi-Day


THURSDAY

FILM

Top Chef Premiere
The Bravo cooking competition series Top Chef is back for its 18th season, which is set in Portland and features two Portland chefs in the running, as well as some famed Portland chefs as judges. (Watch the trailer here for a preview.) As you tune in to the premiere, you might be curious about the artfully plated dishes you see onscreen and want a taste for yourself. We've gathered this guide to Portland spots associated with the show, including restaurants that have been linked to past and present contestants and judges, as well as places featured in the new season (like Akadi and Tillamook Creamery). 

VISUAL ART

Curatorial Talk with Nicole Jean Hill
In this Zoom talk, Blue Sky Gallery curator Nicole Jean Hill will discuss Wyoming homesteader Lora Webb Nichols's frontier-era photographs from the mining town of Encampment, a collection of which are currently on view at the gallery. 

Disjecta ART FIRST Artists' Auction
Disjecta's annual fundraiser features new works donated by over 50 artists. Depending on which ticket option you choose, this year's virtual edition will also send you goodies from local businesses to enjoy whilst you place your bids, like cocktail kits from Buffalo Trace. 

FRIDAY

READINGS & TALKS

At Reed College: The First Recorded Reading of Howl & Other Poems
On a hitchhiking trip through the Pacific Northwest in 1956, Allen Ginsberg and fellow Beat poet Gary Snyder stopped at Snyder's alma mater, Oregon's own Reed College, where the earliest recording of Ginsberg's seminal work Howl took place (you'd think it would have been at San Francisco's City Lights Books, huh?). Acquire some loose-leaf tobacco and kick back in your favorite tattered arm chair, because Omnivore Recordings will release it online (for purchase) for the first time ever. A special limited-edition vinyl version will also be sold through Omnivore's web store and the Reed College bookstore.

THEATER & PERFORMANCE

Triggered Life
Two Black men, Ishmael and Keith, relive their respective stories of childhood abuse in what press materials describe as a "multi-sensory, multimedia, post-traumatic story." Note that half of the performances in this run are reserved for Black and Brown audience members only, so be sure to purchase tickets accordingly if you're not a BIPOC viewer.

SATURDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Inheritance Stories: Oral Histories of Food Culture with Lola Milholland
Writer and noodle maker Lola Milholland will impart her skills in food-related storytelling, deep listening, and recording. In the workshop, you'll learn about your fellow participants' food memories and "experience the responsibility of holding another person’s story." 

TUESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Broken (In the Best Possible Way)
Following her comic memoir The Hilarious World of Depression, Jenny Lawson shares her experience with transcranial magnetic stimulation—a noninvasive procedure that sends an electric current through the brain to improve symptoms of depression—in her new book, Broken (In the Best Possible Way). Hear her talk about it with Powell's and Luvvie Ajayi Jones, host of the Rants & Randomness podcast and author of I’m Judging You: The Do-Better Manual.

Jamie Yourdon
When a mysterious crevasse appears in the Earth and allows for a passage between the living and the dead, a man ventures below to gain wisdom from his dead father. Hear author Jamie Yourdon read from his book The Space Between Two Deaths at this virtual Annie Bloom's event. 

Vulnerability Is My Superpower Live Virtual Event with Jackie Davis
Tune in to this virtual book release party with your kids for a valuable lesson on the power of vulnerability and being honest about your emotions; the core subjects of Jackie Davis's new book Vulnerability is my Superpower.

WEDNESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Consider This with Eric K. Ward
A civil rights advocate with three decades of experience studying authoritarian movements, hate-based violence, and inclusive democracy as the executive director of Western States Center, Eric K. Ward will join Oregon Humanities for a conversation on democracy, participation, and justice.

Willy Vlautin in Conversation With Chelsea Cain
A victim of Portland gentrification gets the spotlight in Willy Vlautin's new novel about a 30-year-old woman with bad credit and multiple jobs who desperately wants to buy the house she lives in with her mother and developmentally disabled brother, Kenny. Hear the author in conversation with Chelsea Cain (Heartsick). 

MULTI-DAY

FILM

Eric Rohmer's Tales of Four Seasons
The Stranger's Charles Mudede once wrote that "the flow of words is sequenced with the motion of bodies" in the film of French director Eric Rohmer ("As a man says something philosophical about love to a woman, he walks to a huge nearby rock and puts a hand on it; as the woman responds by saying something about how his ideas about love are self-serving, she steps away from the man and looks at some trees in the distance"). This newly restored quartet of features, beginning in the 1990s with A Tale of Springtime and moving through the seasons, are some of his most acclaimed works, each dealing with jealousy, intimacy, and the challenges of romance.
(Starting Friday)

Oscar Shorts
See this year's lineup of animated, documentary, and live-action short films nominated for the 2021 Academy Awards, including Gísli Darri Halldórsson and Arnar Gunnarsson's "Yes-People" (animated), about people who cope with everyday battles, from work to relationships to dish-washing; Sophia Nahli Allison and Janice Duncan's "A Love Song for Latasha" (documentary), which highlights the injustice surrounding the shooting of 15-year-old Latasha Harlins at a South Central Los Angeles store; and Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe's "Two Distant Strangers" (live-action), in which a Black cartoonist's repeated attempts to get home to his dog are thwarted by a recurring deadly encounter that forces him to re-live the same awful day over and over again.
(Starting Friday)

MUSIC

Mini Concert 4: Jeff Payne
Eclectic pianist Jeff Payne will play three moving solo pieces at this Fear No Music mini-concert: Courtney Bryan's "A Presence," Margaret Bond's "Troubled Waters," and Quinn Mason's "The Never-Ending Ocean of Identity."
(Monday-Wednesday)

THEATER & PERFORMANCE

Distancias
Geo Alva, Robi Arce, and Michael Cavazos will perform a series of works that explore the physical and emotional distance between humans created by the pandemic and how we've learned to overcome them.
(Friday-Saturday)

Manahatta
Harking all the way back to the first Native American tribe whose land was stolen by European colonizers, Mary Kathryn Nagle's 2018 play uses the story of the Lenape people to reflect on the injustice of the country's founding and ongoing treatment of Native peoples.
(All week)