Streaming Events

The Best Things To Do from Home in Portland This Week: March 1-7, 2021

The Portland International Film Festival, an I, Anonymous Livestream, and More Top Picks
March 1, 2021
Starting this weekend, the Portland International Film Festival goes (mostly) virtual with online premieres of films like Mylissa Fitzsimmons's Everything in the End (pictured), as well as drive-in screenings of hits like Minari. (Courtesy PIFF)

The Portland International Film Festival is the top banana this week, and we've included details on that below, but these first few days of March also bring a host of other ways to freshen up your at-home routine. Read on for our top picks, from the I, Anonymous Live-streaming Show to the Virtual Portland Womxn's March to new locally streaming films like The People vs. Agent Orange and Stray. Plus, check out our StreamLocal events hub, and stay tuned for a roundup of the best socially distanced things to do this weekend. 


Jump to: Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday | Multi-Day


TUESDAY

FILM

Extra Credit: A Q&A with The Duo Behind 'Can't Hardly Wait' and 'Josie & the Pussycats'
A principal duo of late-'90s and early aughts teen comedies, filmmakers Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont (Can't Hardly Wait, Josie and the Pussycats) will join Movie Madness University and Hollywood Theatre programmer Anthony Hudson for a fandom-sating interview that gets into some of the deeper meanings beneath the surface of the genre. 

READINGS & TALKS

The Sum of Us: Heather Mcghee, Presented by West X Midwest
An expert on the American economy, Heather McGhee travels across the country gathering stories from people of all races in her latest book, The Sum of Us, which explores how racism is "the common denominator of our most vexing public problems." She'll likely flesh out what she calls the "Solidarity Dividend" (gains that come when people across races come together to accomplish a common goal) in this online appearance with Literary Arts. 

See Also: Multi-day events


WEDNESDAY

COMEDY

The I, Anonymous Live-streaming Show!
If you're desperately needing some top-notch comedy, then the I, Anonymous Show is for you! Here's how it works: We get the funniest local and national comedians to riff and heckle the wildest, jaw-droppingly wrong, and uncensored I, Anonymous submissions from the famous Stranger and Portland Mercury column, and in return you laugh yer buttz off! Joining your delightful host Kate Murphy (a Mercury "Undisputable Genius of Comedy") will be the following murderers' row of hilarious, nationally beloved comedians: Matt Braunger, Arlo Weierhauser, and Shain Brenden. WM. STEVEN HUMPHREY

MUSIC

March Fo(u)rth METAL MARATHON
KBOO Community Radio will rip it up for seven and a half hours of live metal with members from Heavy Metal Vomit Party, Oil for Kisses, the Metal Margin, and Pandæmonium.

READINGS & TALKS

Powell's Books Presents Renée Watson in Conversation With Nicola Yoon
Coretta Scott King Award-winning YA author Renée Watson will read from and discuss her incredibly sweet-looking new book, Love is a Revolution, about a girl who gets caught in a web of white lies in order to impress her crush and ends up falling in love with herself. She'll be joined by Nicola Yoon, author of Everything, Everything and The Sun Is Also a Star. 

Silent Reading Party
A lot of people are taking the opportunity to turn the online version of The Stranger's super-successful words 'n' vibes experience into a weekly online destination, a respite from (waves hands exasperatedly at basically everything) and an opportunity to simply... slow up, sit down, and just listen to live piano music while sinking into a good book. If you haven't tried it out yet, tonight's the night, and we'll see you at 6pm. If you have tried it out before? Welcome back. It's a damn nice oasis of low-key bliss, isn't it?

See Also: Multi-day events


THURSDAY

COMMUNITY

Speaker Series: The 1918 Flu Pandemic in Clark County (WA)
Learn how the pandemic of 1918 affected Clark County from local historians Holly Chamberlain and Jeff Davis. 

See Also: Multi-day events


FRIDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Powell's Books Presents Richard Brown in Conversation With Brian Benson
In his memoir written in collaboration with author Brian Benson, Richard Brown shares his experience as a Black Portlander passionate about using his work to bridge the divide between the police and the Black community. Join the co-authors for a virtual talk with Powell's.

See Also: Multi-day events


SATURDAY

COMEDY

Free Online Roast of The Hunger Games
Get drunk and drag your favorite (or least favorite) Hunger Games moments with local comedians. 

See Also: Multi-day events


SUNDAY

ACTIVISM & SOCIAL JUSTICE

Virtual Portland Womxn’s March
While the horrible administration that sparked the first Womxn's March is finally out of office, there's still a lot of work to be done to improve intersectional gender equity. This online version of the march will feature a BIPOC activist-led panel discussion on intersectional resistance work, as well as musical and spoken-word performances.


MULTI-DAY

FILM

31st Annual Cascade Festival of African Films
This local film festival, which shows African films made by African filmmakers and encourages Western viewers to engage authentically with African cultures, will move online this year. The program, which lasts for over a month, includes buzzy new features like You Will Die at Twenty (Sudan’s first Oscar submission) and Sam Soko's Softie, about a human-rights activist and provocative photojournalist who decides to run for office in a regional election in his native Kenya.
(All week)

A Glitch in the Matrix
At the core of A Glitch in the Matrix is an all-American tragedy connected to The Matrix, which was released in the last year of the 20th century and is about a bunch of machines who create a virtual reality program for their primary source of energy, human bodies (the sky is scorched or something like that). If you wake up from this VR program, which is supposed to keep humans calm enough to be stably productive, you end up in the "desert of the real," which has no steak or cool clobber. (Digression: The VR program that keeps most sleeping humans happy does not simulate a classless Utopia but what the celebrated French economist calls a "proprietary society" that has the exact same inequalities that plague the real world beyond the silver screen, our world [if you are wondering], and often results in revolts by the poor and oppressed—an examination of this point will bring the whole marvelous, spectacular, cinematic edifice of The Matrix crashing down.) What the Glitch examines, but somehow fails to flesh out (in that pun hovers the phantom of Maurice Merleau-Ponty), which is why the doc is disappointing but still worth watching, is an issue that is much more related to gun control rather than dangers of virtual reality or the possibility that humans live in a simulation. CHARLES MUDEDE
(All week via Cinema 21)

Night of the Kings
A young man is sent to a prison in the middle of the Ivorian forest ruled by its inmates and, as tradition goes with the rising of the red moon, must tell a story to the other prisoners. Learning the tragic fate that awaits him if he fails to engage his audience until dawn, he settles on the mystical life of the legendary outlaw Zama King.
(All week via Northwest Film Center)

The People vs. Agent Orange
After decades of losses following the Agent Orange catastrophe—an herbicide and toxic defoliant chemical introduced by U.S. troops during the Vietnam War that controls weeds in farming, forestry, parks, and playgrounds—two women (one in Vietnam and one in the States) lead a movement to hold the manufacturers accountable.
(Starting Friday via Hollywood Theatre and Clinton Street Theater)

Portland International Film Festival
The Northwest Film Center is partnering with Cinema Unbound to bring you a partial drive-in version of the Portland International Film Festival, featuring IRL screenings of feature films (Minari, Snowpiercer, The Iron Giant) and short film blocks, as well as virtual screenings. Alicia Rose's A Kaddish for Bernie Madoff, Skye Fitzgerald's documentary Hunger Ward, and Mylissa Fitzsimmons's Everything in the End are just a few that we have our eye on.
(Friday-Sunday)

Seventeen
Made for PBS but cut before it aired, this doc took home the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in 1985 for its frank look at a group of high school students and their forays into drugs, partying, and interracial dating in a largely white, largely racist Muncie, Indiana.
(All week via Hollywood Theatre)

Stray
Like their feline counterparts seen in the 2016 documentary Kedi, Elizabeth Lo’s award-winning new film follows stray dogs Zeytin, Nazar, and Kartal as they roam the streets of Turkey, which has a no-kill, no-capture policy toward all its stray animals.
(Starting Friday via Hollywood Theatre and Cinema 21)

THEATER & PERFORMANCE

Profile Theatre: The Mineola Twins
Two almost-identical twins bicker their way through the Eisenhower, Nixon and Reagan/Bush eras in Paula Vogel's The Mineola Twins, which Variety describes as "The Carol Burnett Show with a political consciousness." See an online production from Profile Theatre.
(Friday-Sunday)